Left: Statuette combined with an inscription to the Celtic goddess Abnoba. In the Badischer Landesmuseum de Carlsruhe. RG, Germ., 345 ; LIMC, II.2, n°418, p. 628. Right: Statuette in bronze of Artemis/Diana wearing a chiton*, boots and a quiver in her back. In the Musée des Beaux-Arts of Lyons. LIMC, II.2, p. 603, n°85

“Celtic goddess. Known in both Britain and on the Continent, Abnoba gave her name to the many rivers named Avon, including the famous one in England that flows through the the town where playwright William Shakespeare was born; she also ruled the source of the Danube River in central Europe and was associated with the Black Forest, perhaps because of its numerous rivers. Sometimes this goddess was called Dea Abnoba, which means simply “the goddess Abnoba.” Inscriptions to Abnoba from the Black Forest suggest that the Romans identified her with their woodland goddess Diana. She is sometimes depicted as a huntress accompanied by a hunting dog and a stag.” – The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore by Patricia Monaghan

There is little information available about Abnoba, and any real information is scattered, diminished, or lost altogether. We do know that the Romans equated Her with their goddess Diana. She is thought to be a goddess of childbirth, protector of woods, waters, and wild animals.

It is said that you can petition Abnoba to help preserve wild nature, forest plants, and animals. If you want to dedicate an altar or space to Abnoba, it should be decoarted with forest items like pine cones, fir boughs, and animal imagery. You can also leave offerings of spring water.


Altar of Diana Abnoba in the Roman bath ruin of Badenweiler. Badenweiler / Southern Black Forest / Germany


Altar of Diana Abnoba in the Roman bath ruin of Badenweiler. Badenweiler / Southern Black Forest / Germany

Links and Sources
* Theses

* The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore by Patricia Monaghan

* Sacred Haven


This post does NOT contain affiliate links. I own a copy of the book used as the source and highly recommend it for anyone interested in Celtic mythology and folklore.


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