Amethyst
Raw Amethyst::Photo used with permission from WikiMedia commons author Archaeodontosaurus

Amethyst is a beautiful purple crystal in the quartz family that gets its color for irradiation (typically exposure to the sun, but in this case it is from the iron taking place of the silicon) and trace iron and minerals found within the crystal.  Amethyst can change colors when heat-treated, and if left in the sun for too long, the color will fade and lose its brilliance. It is the birthstone of the month of February, and in ancient Greece, people believed that amethyst would protect the wearer from getting too drunk (1). Amethyst is naturally found in many different countries, including Brazil, South Korea, and the United States.

Amethyst is one of my favorite crystals, and not just because of the natural pretty purple color. Amethyst also has many magickal and spiritual uses, and I’ve outlined some below.

  • Celibacy
  • Sobriety
  • Fidelity
  • Protection
  • Healing

Many people are first drawn to amethyst when they start their journey into crystal healing and magick. I believe that this is because of the healing properties of the crystal itself. Amethyst has been used for a very long time, dating back to Egypt several thousand years B.C. (2). In my personal experience, wearing amethyst has helped to calm my anxiety and quiet the mind, giving me the needed space to focus on the things that I need to do. It has also been known to help with many different physical, emotional, and spiritual ailments.

It is said that amethyst, with its healing and protection properties, is a good crystal for meditation, as it is closely connected with the third-eye chakra. During meditation, you can hold a piece of amethyst for protection and clarity, allowing your spiritual self to transcend and attain a higher knowledge of the worlds beyond the physical plane while keeping yourself protected.

Do you use amethyst in your practice? Do you wear amethyst jewelry, or keep the crystal close to you? Tell me about your experience!

Sources

  1. https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica/Amethyst
  2. https://journals.uair.arizona.edu/index.php/jaei/article/view/18

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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